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Tunisian Blanket CAL 2024 – General Information and Practice Hexagon

Welcome to the kickoff of the Tunisian Blanket CAL for 2024! I’m thrilled to share all the essential details with you, including a practice hexagon to get you started. To support your journey, there’s a collection of videos available to guide you through making your first hexagon.

The Tunisian-In-The-Round technique can be a bit tricky at first, so we’re beginning with an easy pattern. The practice hexagon, which doubles as a gauge swatch, is smaller than the blanket’s hexagons. This design is ideal for beginners as it covers everything you’ll need to know before diving into the larger hexagons.

Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter - is made up of hexagons worked in the round.

Disclaimer: this post may contain affiliate links – please see my affiliate disclosure for details.

Introduction

Tunisian-in-the-round crochet is a technique that involves working in a continuous spiral with a double-ended hook and two different strands of yarn, resulting in beautiful, intricate patterns. With no color change in the middle of a round, the magic happens with just two contrasting colors: one for the forward pass and another for the return pass.

This pattern consists of hexagons joined together to create a blanket. I thoroughly enjoyed making my hexagons and assembling them into my final blanket, and I hope you will too!

Experience Level

Intermediate – You should be comfortable working in the round with a double-ended hook.

What You Will Need

Yarn

This blanket pattern is versatile and can be made with any yarn. For the best results, I recommend using at least two contrasting colors, as this will make the pattern stand out beautifully. I used Chroma Fingering yarn in colors:

  1. Bare – 4200 yards / 3840 m / 37 oz / 1060 gm (11 skeins)
  2. Vermont – 3850 yds / 3500 m / 34 oz / 970 gm (10 skeins)

This pattern is also perfect for utilizing your yarn scraps! You can create each hexagon with a different color combination or use a common color for either the forward or return pass. Just ensure there’s enough contrast between the two yarns to make the pattern stand out.

Hook

Choose a hook that matches the yarn you’ve selected. I typically create a gauge swatch using a few different hook sizes before deciding. This helps me understand how the fabric will feel and whether I want it to be more or less drapey. For this blanket, I built a double-ended hook using two hooks – one size 5 mm (H-8) for the forward pass and another size 4.5 mm (7) for the return pass.

Alternatively, you could use a double-ended hook with two hooks of the same size at both ends. You can create such a hook by using two hooks of the same size from an interchangeable set or you can use hooks specifically designed as double-ended hooks.

For making the border, I used a traditional crochet hook of size 3.5 mm (E-4) .

Notions

You’ll need six stitch markers (five of the same color and one of a different color to mark the beginning of a round), a measuring tape, scissors for cutting yarn, and a tapestry needle for weaving in tails.

Pattern Repeats

Repeats are mentioned in this pattern in three different ways: 

  1. 4 tss ->
    tss in the next 4 stitches 
  2. (2 tks, 4 trs) * 2 ->
    2 tks, 4 trs, 2 tks, 4 trs
  3. [(2 tks, 4 trs) * 2] * 2 ->
    [2 tks, 4 trs, 2 tks, 4 trs] * 2 ->
    2 tks, 4 trs, 2 tks, 4 trs, 2 tks, 4 trs, 2 tks, 4 trs

Colors

C1: Bare 
C2: Vermont

Support videos

All support videos for this CAL can be found on my YouTube channel: Click here for the dedicated playlist.

Abbreviations

  1. tfs – Tunisian Full Stitch –  Insert hook into the next space between two stitches, yarn over, pull up a loop on the hook.
  2. tks – Tunisian Knit Stitch – Insert hook in the space between the two vertical bars of the next stitch, pull up a loop on the hook.
  3. trs – Tunisian Reverse Stitch – Insert hook in the back vertical bar, yarn over, pull up a loop on the hook.
  4. tss – Tunisian Simple Stitch– Insert hook in the vertical bar, yarn over, pull up a loop on the hook.
  5. twtksTwisted Tunisian Knit Stitch – Insert hook in between the 2 vertical bars in the opposite direction, yarn over, pull up a loop on the hook.
  6. twtssTwisted Tunisian Simple Stitch (twisted upwards) – Insert hook in the vertical bar in the opposite direction, yarn over, pull up a loop on the hook.
  7. twtss-twtks – Twisted Tunisian Simple Stitch and Twisted Tunisian Knit Stitch in the same stitch 
  8. tks-tss – Tunisian Knit Stitch and Tunisian Simple Stitch in the same stitch. 
  9. yo – yarn over 
  10. BOR – Bind Off Round

Right Handed Stitch Tutorials

Left Handed Stitch Tutorials

Pattern Notes

  1. This pattern is written in English/US terms.
  2. The specific instructions for the forward and return passes are not included in the written instructions, as they are detailed separately.
  3. With every other round, 12 stitches are added, resulting in an average increase of 6 stitches per round.
  4. It is possible to make all the hexagons from the charts only. The charts are worked from right to left, bottom to top. However, left handed people will get a mirror image of the pattern if they follow the instructions this way. Left handed people can read the charts from left to right to get the exact same hexagon.
  5. We work the Forward Pass and Return Pass with different colors, we do not change color for either pass throughout the hexagon. The pattern is created by making different stitches to bring the desired color to the front of the hexagon.
  6. I recommend using two contrasting colors or if you are using color changing yarn, plan your hexagons such that the two colors you are working with are different enough for the pattern to pop.
  7. I recommend blocking your hexagons before joining, it brings them all to the same size and shape and that makes it so much easier to join them!
  8. This pattern is worked in a spiral. The written instructions and charts do not contain instructions for the Return Pass. The Forward and Return passes are worked as mentioned below.
  9. Since this pattern is worked in a spiral, you will turn your work every time you want to pick up or cast off loops and the placement of the increases (12 stitches will be added every other round) will turn the work into a hexagon.
  10. The first 3 rounds are for the set up, you will start seeing a glimpse of the hexagon starting round 4 which will become more pronounced as you make more rounds.

To avoid missing a block or the chance to download the free chart, sign up for my newsletter. I’ll send you a reminder whenever a new block is released!

Using Stitch Markers

The hardest part of this pattern is the first 4 rounds. I strongly recommend using 6 stitch markers to mark the beginning of each edge – use a different color for the beginning of the first edge because that marks the beginning of the round. As you make each round, move the stitch markers up so you don’t lose the beginning of every edge.

Forward and Return Pass Instructions

To work in the round, you’ll need a double-ended hook. You will also need a different strand of yarn for both forward and return passes.

Forward Pass: You will pick up loops on your hook from one end with yarn C1 (Bare in my hexagons). The right side of your project will be facing you.

Return Pass: You will remove loops from your hook using the other end with yarn C2 (Vermont in my hexagons). Make sure the wrong side of your project is facing you. To remove loops from your hook:

  • At the beginning of your project – yo, pull through one loop.
  • At all other times – yo, pull through 2 loops until there are 3 or 4 loops left on the hook.

Remember, each time you switch between the two passes, you’ll need to turn your work and slide your loops to the opposite end of the hook. And once you reach the last stitch of the Forward Pass before the bind off round, you will cast off all loops while working the Return Pass before continuing to the bind off round.

Sizing

The size of your hexagons will depend on the yarn you choose. The measurements provided here are based on the pattern’s gauge. In my blanket, I used 29 out of the 30 hexagons from the pattern, as shown in the diagram. 

You can also use these hexagons individually as dishcloths, or adjust the number to make a larger or smaller blanket. Feel free to experiment with different arrangements to create blankets of varying shapes.

Measurements of the Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter.

How to read the charts

  1. Every hexagon is worked in a continuous spiral. 
  2. The provided chart represents one sixth of the entire pattern. Only one edge of each round is shown in the chart, and you’ll need to repeat the instructions a total of six times to complete your hexagon.
  3. The stitch count for the last round is provided at the top of the chart.
  4. The round number is indicated on the outer edges of each round in the chart.
  5. The Bind Off Round is depicted in the chart with a black background. This is to help you easily identify and follow this specific round in the pattern.
  6. The pattern is colored into the chart to show you what to expect after you complete your hexagon. Please keep in mind that you do not have to make any color changes on any round.
  7. Symbols on the chart: 
    • A square with a ‘F’ indicates a Tunisian Full Stitch.
    • A square with a ‘K’ indicates a Tunisian Knit Stitch.
    • A square with a ‘R’ indicates a Tunisian Reverse Stitch.
    • A square with a ‘S’ indicates a Tunisian Simple Stitch.
    • A square with a ‘WS’ indicates a Twisted Tunisian Simple Stitch.
    • A square with a ‘MR’ indicates that a stitch will be made in the magic ring.
    • Squares with a ‘C1’ indicate that a Tunisian Knit Stitch and a Tunisian Simple Stitch will be made in the same stitch.
    • Squares with a ‘C2’ indicate that a Twisted Tunisian Simple Stitch and Twisted Tunisian Knit Stitch will be made in the same stitch.
    • The black squares indicate the bind off round.
  8. How to read the chart:
    • Right handed crocheters
      • The pattern is read from bottom to top, right to left.
    • Left handed crocheters
      • The pattern is read from bottom to top, left to right.
      • The symbols C1 and C2 will be flipped.

Practice Swatch

Practice Hexagon of the Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter.

Chart

Practice Hexagon Pattern Chart for Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter - is made up of hexagons worked in the round.

* Please note that this chart will remain permanently available for free on my blog. Unlike the other hexagons, it will not be taken down after 24 hours.

To avoid missing a block or the chance to download the free chart, sign up for my newsletter. I’ll send you a reminder whenever a new block is released!

Written Instructions

Round 1: In a magic ring, *pick up a loop, chain 1; repeat from * until you have 6 loops on the hook. [6 sts]

Round 2: (tks, tfs) * 6 [12 sts]

Round 3: (2 tks, tfs) * 6 [18 sts]

Round 4: (twtss-twtks, tks, tks-tss) * 6 [30 sts]

Round 5: (twtss, 3 tks, tss) * 6 [30 sts]

Round 6: (twtss-twtks, tks, trs, tks, tks-tss) * 6 [42 sts]

Round 7: (twtss, tks, trs, tks, trs, tks, tss) * 6 [42 sts]

Round 8: (twtss-twtks, trs, 3 tks, trs, tks-tss) * 6 [54 sts]

Round 9: (twtss, 2 tks, trs, tks, trs, 2 tks, tss) * 6 [54 sts]

Round 10: (twtss-twtks, 3 tks, trs, 3 tks, tks-tss) * 6 [66 sts]

Round 11: (twtss, 9 tks, tss) * 6 [66 sts]

Round 12: (twtss-twtks, 9 tks, tks-tss) * 6 [78 sts]

Round 13: (twtss, 11 trs, tss) * 6 [78 sts]

Bind Off Round: (13 trs) * 6 [78 sts]
This is the bind off round. You will make a slip stitch every time you pick up a loop on your hook. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Gauge

The practice hexagon mentioned earlier will be your gauge swatch for the entire pattern. If your practice hexagon turns out larger than mine, your final hexagons will also be larger than the dimensions mentioned in the pattern. Conversely, if it is smaller, your final hexagons will be smaller as well.

Gauge is not crucial for this pattern; what matters more is creating a fabric that you like. Choose a hook that matches your selected yarn and make your final hexagons with that combination. Your blanket may end up smaller or larger than mine, but it’s more important to have the right fabric, in my opinion.

Here are the measurements of my practice hexagon –

Measurements of the Practice Hexagon from the Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter.

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Ipsa Blanket - Tunisian Blanket CAL '24 by KnitterKnotter - is made up of hexagons worked in the round.